Krisha – Secrets, lies and murky pasts in a devastating family drama

Krisha (2015)

Our introduction to the titular Krisha (Krisha Fairchild) is an intriguing, dreamlike opening shot of her staring out at us: vulnerable, lost, alone. It is one of many moments in Trey Edward Shults’ film that lets us into the true psyche of his character, while on the surface she appears to be all smiles and happiness at a busy family reunion. A touching yet hilarious film about secrets that won’t stay buried and a past that can’t be forgotten, Krisha (2015) is also filled with a wonderful authentic atmosphere that is felt in every element of the production.

This realism is felt from the moment we enter the house with Krisha, Shults using a stunning long take that follows behind her as she hauls her suitcase through the neighbourhood before she awkwardly greets family members she hasn’t seen for years. It is also in the semi-improvised dialogue that pervades every scene, Shults bravely letting his cast take the reins, something that they obviously find easy due to the fact that several of them are related to each other in real life. Along with the dialogue, this lends Krisha a free-flowing energy, characters talking over each other, the noise level never ceasing as each fights for acknowledgement amid the chaos. It also adds a brilliant comedic element to the film, with plenty of laugh-out-loud moments happening amongst all of the family commotion.

Happy families as Krisha (Krisha Fairchild) looks on...

Yet what starts as a comedy gradually descends into a dark and moving drama as Krisha starts to lose her grip on herself and the situation she finds herself in. Krisha Fairchild is astounding in these moments, her riveting performance loathsome yet ridden with pathos – a character who is truly her own worst enemy. You don’t know whether to hate her or love her…or both.

It is also in these moments that Shults’ directorial style and cinematography really comes into its own, practically becoming another character in the film. While the constantly moving fluid camera at the start authentically takes in the actions of the tale instead of dictating it, the later, darker moments of Shults’ story are even more perfectly emphasised through his choice of cinematic devices. Switching to a different camera and smaller frame size, Shults compresses the tale and makes it seem as if we are inside Krisha’s own damaged mind, a method that adds a compellingly dreamlike edge as the story hurtles towards its conclusion. Inventive and engaging, this directorial style is also something that adds to the overall uniqueness of Krisha, something that would make repeat viewings wholly rewarding.

Krisha tries to reconnect with Trey (Trey Edward Shults)...

With the vibe of a Mike Leigh film and a palpable realism that is felt throughout, Krisha is one of the greatest representations of a family seen on film. Assembling a whole range of methods to bring his dysfunctional family to life, in particular innovative use of style and cinematic devices, Shults creates a gripping tale that is both hilarious and poignant. His film is all the more impactful for Krisha Fairchild’s stunning central performance – just one of the many reasons this perfect film will stay with you for a long time after watching it. That this is also Trey Edward Shults directorial debut is nothing short of astounding; a sentiment that perfectly describes the rest of the film too.

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~ by square-eyed-geek on March 13, 2017.

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